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6/18/1963 12:00:00 AM - Black students boycotted Public Schools

Three thousand Black students boycotted Boston public schools as protest against de facto segregation.
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6/30/1974 12:00:00 AM - Mrs. M.L.K. and deacon Boykin were killed

A Black man shot and killed Mrs. Martin Luther King Sr. and deacon Edward Boykin during church services at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Atlanta. The assailant, Marcus Chennault of Dayton, Ohio, was later convicted and sentenced to death.
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3/23/1968 12:00:00 AM - 1st Non-voting Congressional Delegate

Rev. Walter Fauntroy, a former aide of Martin Luther King Jr., became the first nonvoting congressional delegate from the District of Columbia since the Reconstruction period.
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6/1/1835 12:00:00 AM - 5th National Negro Convention takes on word Negro

The 5th National Negro Convention met in Philadelphia and urged blacks to abandon theuse of terms "African" and "colored" when referring to "Negro" institutions, organizations and to themselves.
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4/11/1972 12:00:00 AM - Benjamin L. Hooks

Benjamin L. Hooks, a Memphis lawyer-minister, becomes the first African American named to the Federal Communications Commission.
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4/8/1872 12:00:00 AM - Birthday

Ruth Gaines-Shelton Born April 8, 1872. African- American Playwright born at Glasgow, MO. Best known for prize winning comedy The Church Fight, which was published in Crisis (a publication of NAACP) in May of 1926.
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6/2/1899 12:00:00 AM - Black Americans observed day of fasting

Black Americans observed day of fasting called by National Afro-American Council to protest lynching and racial massacres.
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3/1/1910 12:00:00 AM - BLACK NAMED CHIEF SWEEPER

COLUMBUS, OHIO,--a BLACK MAN, Mr. Everette Spurlock, has been named superintendent of this city's street cleaning department. The negroe community is overjoyed that the city has finally recognized the dependability of its colored population. Mr. Spurlock's job pays $1,500 per year. Although persently all his 100 employees are colored, Spurlock says white will be employed if there is a vacancy.
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2/21/1987 12:00:00 AM - Black Rebellion in Tampa, Florida

African Americans in Tampa, Florida rebelled after an African American man was killed by a white police officer while in custody.
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5/1/1946 12:00:00 AM - Black Woman named "American Mother of the Year."

Emma Clarissa Clement, a black woman and mother of Atlanta University President Rufus E. Clement, was named "American Mother of the Year" by the Golden Rule Foundation. She was the first Afro-American woman to receive the honor.
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3/3/1852 12:00:00 AM - Daniel A. P. Murray born

Born in Baltimore on March 3. Murray, an African-American, was assistant librarian of Congress, and a collector of books and pamphlets by and about black Americans.
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3/26/1831 12:00:00 AM - Death of Richard Allen

Death of Richard Allen (71), who was nominated by author Vernon Loggins for the title "Father of the Negro." Allen and representatives from four other black Methodist congregations met to organize a new denomination, the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Allen was chosen as the first bishop of the church, the first fully independent black denomination in America. He had succeeded in charting a separate religious identity for African-Americans. Allen also recognized the importance of education to the future of the African-American community. In 1795 he opened a day school for sixty children and in 1804 founded the "Society of Free People of Colour for Promoting the Instruction and School Education of Children of African Descent." By 1811 there were no fewer than 11 black schools in the city.
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3/24/1912 12:00:00 AM - Dorothy Height born

Birthday of Dorothy Irene Height in Richmond, Virginia. Height, president of the National Council of Negro Women for more than three decades, organized a successful drive to place a statue of Mary McLeod Bethune in a District of Columbia park. Once erected, the statue became the first of an African American in a public park in Washington, D.C.
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4/6/1869 12:00:00 AM - Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett

Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett, Principal of the Institute for Colored Youth, Philadelphia, named minister to Haiti and became the first major Black diplomat and the first American Black to receive a major appointment from the United Stated Government.
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4/16/1869 12:00:00 AM - Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett

Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett becomes the first African American to serve in a diplomatic post for the U.S. (Consul-General to Haiti and the Dominican Republic)
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2/27/1833 12:00:00 AM - First American-born woman to give public lectures

On this day in 1833, Maria W. Steward delivered one of the four speeches which confirmed her place in history as the first American-born woman to give public lectures. Stewards lectures focused on encouraging African-Americans to attain education, political rights, and public recognition for their achievements. Her speech on thi day delivered at the African Masonic Hall in Boston, Massachusetts, was titled "On African Rights and Liberty." Sixty-seven years later in Boston on this same day, African-American teacher and poet Angelina Weld Grimke was born. Grimke was a descendant of the famous white abolitionist and feminist sisters Angelina and Sarah Grimke.
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6/4/1989 12:00:00 AM - Four African Americans win Tony Awards

Four African Americans win Tony Awards for Black and Blue
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6/16/1976 12:00:00 AM - Hector Petersen, a 13 year old Soweto schoolboy is the first to die in what will

Hector Petersen, a 13 year old Soweto schoolboy is the first to die in what will become the "Children's Crusade", the first nationwide black South African uprising in the 1970's. The violence will last 16 month and result in 5700 death, 3,900 injuries, and 5,900 detentions.
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3/31/1856 12:00:00 AM - Henry Ossian Flipper, the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military A

Henry Ossian Flipper, the first African American graduate of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was born in Thomasville, Georgia. Enduring heavy racism during his schooling, Flipper went on to establish a military career. This was ended however after he was falsely accused of embezzling funds.
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3/28/1968 12:00:00 AM - Interruption of Protest March

Race riot in Memphis, Tenn. interrupted protest march led by Martin Luther King Jr. in support of striking sanitation workers. National Guard called up.
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4/2/1855 12:00:00 AM - John Mercer Langston, considered the first African

John Mercer Langston, considered the first African American to be elected to public office is elected clerk of Brownhelm, Ohio township
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4/9/1950 12:00:00 AM - Juanita Hall becomes the first African American

Juanita Hall becomes the first African American to win a Tony award for her role as Bloody Mary in the musical South Pacific.
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2/1/1902 12:00:00 AM - Langston Hughes

One of the most famous poets, Langston Hughes was born in the year 1902. Hughes came from the Harlem Renaissance, the early stages of the Black Arts Movement. Hughes was well known in the streets of Harlem, making him one of the greatest poets of all time. Before his death in 1967, he wrote fifteen collections of poetry, two autobiographies, and seven collections of short stories, as well as other juvenile books and translations. Among the many he did were The Poetry of the Negro, and Weary Blues. His mark upon this time, made him the most profilic and dignified poets of Harlem and throughout the world.
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6/6/1950 12:00:00 AM - Lt. Gen. Frank E. Petersen (1932-).

On June 6, 1950, Frank Petersen enlisted in the Navy. At the age of 20, he was the first Afro-American to be named a naval aviator in the Marine Corp. He was also the first African American to command a fighter squadon, a fighter air group, an air wing, and a major base. Lt. Gen. Frank. Petersen, was considered by his friends to be a leader and a gentleman in his affairs.
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5/5/1969 12:00:00 AM - Moneta Sleet becomes the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize for his

Moneta Sleet becomes the first African American to win a Pulitzer Prize for his photograph of Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. and her daughter at her husband's funeral
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3/15/1933 12:00:00 AM - NAACP began a coordinated attack on segregation

NAACP began a coordinated attack on segregation and discrimination, filing a suit against the University of North Carolina on behalf of Thomas Hocutt. Case was lost on a technicality after the president of a Black college refused to certify the records of the plaintiff.
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2/22/1911 12:00:00 AM - On this day, the "Bronze Muse" died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Frances El

On this day, the "Bronze Muse" died in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Frances Ellen Watkins Harper wrote more than a dozen books, including 'Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects'(1854); 'Moses, a Story of the Nile'(1869);and 'Sketches of Southern Life'(1872). Harper was the most famous female poet of her day and the most famous African-American poet of the 19th century. Also a well-known orator, she spoke frequently in public(sometimes twice in one day)promoting equal rights for women and African-Americans. She was a worker for the Underground Railroad, and in 1896 she helped establish the National Association of Colored Women.
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2/25/1928 12:00:00 AM - One-Man Show of Art

"One-Man Show of Art by Negro, First of Kind Here, Opens Today," read the headline of a front-page article in 'The New York Times' on this day. The article announced the opening of Archibald J. Motley, Jr's show at the New Gallery on Madison Avenue. This was the first time in History that an artist had made the front page of 'The New York Times' and it was the second one-person show by an African-American artist (the first being Henry O. Tanner). African scenes, voodoo dances, and African-Americans at leisure were themes presented by the artist.
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5/10/1962 12:00:00 AM - Southern School News reported that 246,988 or 7.6

Southern School News reported that 246,988 or 7.6 per cent of the Black pupils in public schools in seventeen Southern and Border States and the District of Columbia attended integrated classes in 1962.
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2/13/1892 12:00:00 AM - The first African American performers

The first African American performers, the World's Fair Colored Opera Company, appear at Carnegie Hall.
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3/27/2002 12:00:00 AM - The First Black Psychic

Shirley Ajayi was the first African American given a part on a television show as a psychic! The show lasted for about one year[actually six months] in Chicago, Illinois since the show was seasonal! Shirley started her career the minute her predictions came true! She was renamed 'Aura' and hired to do the remaining shows for some six months! After that many psychic flooded the scene from Psychic Friends Network to the present Miss Cleo! Even the movie 'The Matrix' was influenced by her with the character 'The Oracle'. This fact is true! Shirley is also a distant cousin to Oprah Winfrey who also was on television in Chicago around the same year 1986!
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4/7/1940 12:00:00 AM - The first U.S. stamp ever to honor an African American is issued bearing the lik

The first U.S. stamp ever to honor an African American is issued bearing the likeness of Booker T. Washington.
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3/16/1999 12:00:00 AM - Thomas L. Jennings

Thomas L. Jennings - Mr. Jennings was the first African-American to have patented an invention. In 1821, Mr. Jennings was issued a patent for a dry-cleaning process known as "dry scouring." An activist for the rights of African Americans, he served as Assistant Secretary of the first annual Convention of the People of Color in June 1831 in Philadelphia.
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4/28/1983 12:00:00 AM - Two African American women, Alice Walker and Gloria Naylor win American Book Awa

Two African American women, Alice Walker and Gloria Naylor win American Book Awards for fiction
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5/22/1863 12:00:00 AM - War Department established Bureau of Colored

War Department established Bureau of Colored Troops and launched aggressive campaign for recruitment of Black soldiers.
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3/4/1837 12:00:00 AM - Weekly Advocate changed its name

Weekly Advocate changed its name to the Colored American, the second major Black newspaper. Some forty Black newspapers were published before the Civil War.
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