Welcome to BlackFacts!

Learn Black History. Teach Black History.



2/10/1787 12:00:00 AM - 1787 Georgia's House of Assembly named Willliam Few, Abraham Baldwin, William

1787 Georgia's House of Assembly named Willliam Few, Abraham Baldwin, William Pierce, Georgie Walton, William Houston, and Nathaniel Pendleton as Georgia's commissioners to the Philadelphia constitutional convention.
Learn More »

2/10/1964 12:00:00 AM - 1964 After 12 days of debate and voting on 125 amendments, the U.S. House of

1964 After 12 days of debate and voting on 125 amendments, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 by a vote of 290-130. The bill prohibited any state or local government or public facility from denying access to anyone because of race or ethnic origin. It further gave the U.S. Attorney General the power to bring school desegregation law suits. The bill allowed the federal government the power to bring school desegregation law suits and to cut off federal funds to companies or states who discriminated. It forbade labor organizations or interstate commercial companies from discriminating against workers due to race or ethnic origins. Lastly, the federal government could compile records of denial of voting rights. After passage in the House, the bill went to the Senate, which after 83 days of debate passed a similar package on June 19 by a vote of 73 to 27. President Lyndon Johnson signed the legislation on July 2. Later, future Georgia governor Lester Maddox would become the first person prosecuted under the Civil Rights Act.
Learn More »

3/23/1968 12:00:00 AM - 1st Non-voting Congressional Delegate

Rev. Walter Fauntroy, a former aide of Martin Luther King Jr., became the first nonvoting congressional delegate from the District of Columbia since the Reconstruction period.
Learn More »

6/29/1820 12:00:00 AM - 283 Africans were recaptured on American Shores

On Thursday, June 29, 1820, at 3:00 P.M., nineteen years before the "Amistad" incident, 283 African slaves (two dead and 281 were in chains) were aboard a slave vessel named "The Antelope", when they were recaptured by the United States Treasury cutter "Dallas", under the command of John Jackson. The seizure occurred between Amelia Island and the Florida Coast. After about 2,576 days of captivity and legal battle in the United States, 120 Africans died, 2 were missing, 39 were enslaved in the United States (the 39 included 36 men, one woman, and two boys), and 120 Africans of the Antelope, (there were 22 additional recaptured Africans that were sent with this group, bringing the number to 142), were released from custody by the United States Supreme Court, and sent to Liberia on July 18, 1827.
Learn More »

4/14/1775 12:00:00 AM - Abolitionist Society Organized

First abolitionist society in United States organized in Philadelphia.
Learn More »

5/27/1967 12:00:00 AM - Aborigines to be counted in census

Ninety per cent of white Australians voted in today's referendum for a proposal to count Aborigines in the census and to allow the federal government to make special laws for them. Until now their affairs have been administered solely by the states. The other proposal, to break the nexus between the Senate and the House of Representatives, which dictates that the latter have double the numbers as the former, was rejected. The Federal Council for the Advancement of Aborigines has already proposed a reform plan, including a national seceriatg, an education foundation, an arts and crafts council, a national survey of Aboriginal matters and a policy to deal with them
Learn More »

6/28/1978 12:00:00 AM - Admittance of student to U of California Medical

U.S. Supreme Court ordered the University of California Medical School at Davis to admit Allan P. Bakke in so-called reverse discrimination suit.
Learn More »

2/10/1992 12:00:00 AM - Alex Haley, renowned author, dies

American biographer, scriptwriter, author who became famous with the publication of the novel ROOTS, which traces his ancestry back to Africa and covers seven American generations as they are taken slaves to the United States. The book was adapted to television series, and woke up an interest in genealogy, particularly among African-Americans. Haley himself commented that the book was not so much history as a study of mythmaking. "What Roots gets at in whatever form, is that it touches the pulse of how alike we human beings are when you get down to the bottom, beneath these man-imposed differences."
Learn More »

4/12/1869 12:00:00 AM - Anti-Klan Law

North Carolina legislature passed anti-Klan Law.
Learn More »

6/15/1921 12:00:00 AM - Bessie Coleman receives pilot's license

Bessie Coleman attended the "...Ecole d'Aviation des Freres Caudron at Le Crotoy in Somme for a 10 month flight training course. Flying a French Nieuport Type 82, Bessie finished the course three months early and obtained her Federation Aeronautique Internationale (FAI) license on June 15, 1921--the first U.S. woman of any race to do so directly..."
Learn More »

5/2/1870 12:00:00 AM - Birth of William Seymour

William Seymour was born in Centerville, Louisiana. He is credited as being the inspirational force behind the birth of Pentecostalism in the United States.
Learn More »

5/1/1946 12:00:00 AM - Black becomes governor of Virgin Islands

Former federal judge William H. Hastie was confirmed as governor of the Virgin Islands. Hastie became the only Afro-American to govern a U.S. state or territory since Reconstruction.
Learn More »

3/7/1859 12:00:00 AM - Blacks Declared Non-Citizens of US

The Acting Commissioner of General Lands for the United States, J.S. Wilson, stated that blacks were not citizens of the United States, and therefore were not legally entitled to preempt public lands.
Learn More »

4/15/1861 12:00:00 AM - Blacks Denied Right to Fight for Country

President Lincoln called for 75,000 troops to put down the rebellion. Lincoln administration rejected Black volunteers. For almost two years straight Black Americans fought for the right, as one humorist put it, "to be kilt".
Learn More »

3/1/1841 12:00:00 AM - Blanche Kelso Bruce

Blanche Kelso Bruce, first Black to serve a full term in the United States Senate was born a slave in Prince Edward County, Virginia.
Learn More »

2/3/1874 12:00:00 AM - Blanche Kelso Bruce elected to US Senate

Blanche Kelso Bruce elected to a full six-year term in the U.S. Senate by the Mississippi legislature.
Learn More »

5/21/1881 12:00:00 AM - Blanche Kelso Bruce sworn in as a U.S. Senator.

Blanche Kelso Bruce was a US Senator from Mississippi; the first black man to serve a full term in the senate, and the first person born into slavery to preside over the senate. While serving in the senate, he was an advocate for civil rights for blacks, native Americans, Chinese immigrants and former Confederates (as we remember, the radical republicans weren't too nice to that group). After serving in the Senate, Bruce held many government appointments, including Register of the Treasury (appointed by President Garfield), recorder of deeds for DC, and a second term as Register of the Treasury. Bruce was the first African American to be represented on US currency, in the form of his signature as Register of the Treasury. Register of the Treasury 05/21/1881 through 06/05/1885 and 12/03/1897 through 03/17/1898
Learn More »

4/4/1967 12:00:00 AM - Civil Rights

April 4, 1967. Speaking before the Overseas Press Club in New York City, Revered Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr, announced his opposition to the Vietnam War.
Learn More »

4/3/1944 12:00:00 AM - Civil Rights

April 3, 1944. The US Supreme Court, in an 8-1 ruling declared that Blacks could not be barred form voting in the Texas Democratic primaries. The high court repudiated the contention that political parties are private associations and held that discrimination aginst Blacks violated the 15th Amendment.
Learn More »

3/7/1965 12:00:00 AM - Civil Rights March in Alabama

Through the 25th, Alabama state troopers and sheriff's deputies dispersed Selma-to-Montgomery civil rights march with tear gas and billy clubs, Three white Unitarian ministers, including Rev. James J. Reeb, attacked on streets of Selma, Alabama. Reeb, who was participating in civil rights demonstrations, died later in Birmingham hospital.
Learn More »

6/16/1969 12:00:00 AM - Clayton Powell almost dismissed from Government

U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the suspension of Adam Clayton Powell Jr. from the House of Representatives was unconstitutional.
Learn More »

3/3/1968 12:00:00 AM - COINTELPRO Memorandum

A memorandum sent to field offices of the FBI set goals for what was termed as a new "counterintelligence program" against African American Nationalist groups. The objective was to block attempts by targeted groups to coalesce, grow and exist. The agencey believed unity was the "first step toward a Mau-Mau-style uprising" in the United States and the beginning of an "Black Revolution." The FBI hierarchy further believed their efforts would prevent the rise of a "Black Messiah" who could unify and "electrify" the masses. Top candidates for this leadership position were Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr.
Learn More »

6/21/1945 12:00:00 AM - Col.B.O. Davis Jr.

Col. B.O. Davis Jr. Named commander of Godman Field (Ky.) and became the first Black to head an Army Air Force base in the United States.
Learn More »

2/26/1877 12:00:00 AM - Conference in the Wormley Hotel

At a conference in the Wormley Hotel in Washington, representatives of Rutherford B. Hayes and representatives of the South negotiated agreement which paved the way for the election of Hayes as president and the withdrawal of federal troops from the South.
Learn More »

6/25/1868 12:00:00 AM - Congress cracks down on civil rights for blacks

Congress readmitted North Carolina, South Carolina, Louisiana, Georgia, Alabama and Florida on condition "that the constitutions of said states shall never be amended or changed as to deprive any citizen or class of citizens or the United States of the right to vote in said states who are entitled to vote by the constitutions thereof herein recognized."
Learn More »

4/14/1868 12:00:00 AM - Constitution Approved in South Carolina

South Carolina voters approved constitution, 70,758 to 27,228, and elected state officers, including the first Black cabinet officer, Francis L. Cardozo, secretary of state. New constitution required integrated education and contained a strong bill of rights section: "Distinctions on account of race or color, in any case whatever, shall be prohibited, and all classes of citizens shall enjoy equally all common, public, legal and political privileges."
Learn More »

4/23/1955 12:00:00 AM - Court Decision in Favor of Segregation

U.S. Supreme Court refused to review lower court decision which would ban segregation in intrastate bus travel.
Learn More »

5/8/1915 12:00:00 AM - Death of Henry McNeal Turner (82), first Black

Death of Henry McNeal Turner (82), first Black chaplain in the U.S. Army and AME bishop.
Learn More »

3/7/1870 12:00:00 AM - Denouncement of Klan violence

Gov. William W. Holden of North Carolina denounced Klan violence and issued proclaimation declaring Almanance County in a state of insurrection.
Learn More »

3/24/1912 12:00:00 AM - Dorothy Height born

Birthday of Dorothy Irene Height in Richmond, Virginia. Height, president of the National Council of Negro Women for more than three decades, organized a successful drive to place a statue of Mary McLeod Bethune in a District of Columbia park. Once erected, the statue became the first of an African American in a public park in Washington, D.C.
Learn More »

3/27/1969 12:00:00 AM - Dr.C.Eric Lincoln

Dr. C. Eric Lincoln, professor of religion and sociology at Union Theological Seminary, was elected president of the organization.
Learn More »

4/6/1869 12:00:00 AM - Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett

Ebenezer Don Carlos Bassett, Principal of the Institute for Colored Youth, Philadelphia, named minister to Haiti and became the first major Black diplomat and the first American Black to receive a major appointment from the United Stated Government.
Learn More »

6/12/1886 12:00:00 AM - Ex-slave left millions in will

The Georgia State Supreme Court sustained the will of the late David Dickson, thus making Amanda Eubanks the wealthiest Negro in America. Dickson, a former slaveholder, willed more than half a million dollars to Eubanks. White relatives of Dickson, a bachelor, had contested the will on the grounds that it was illegal for a white man to leave property to his black illegitimate children.
Learn More »

2/7/1946 12:00:00 AM - Filibuster in U.S. Senate killed FEPC bill

Filibuster in U.S. Senate killed FEPC bill.
Learn More »

2/1/1865 12:00:00 AM - First African American Before US Supreme Court

John Sweat Rock (1825-1866), a noted Boston lawyer, became in 1865 the first African-American to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court and the first Black person to speak before the U.S. House of Representatives.
Learn More »

2/11/1644 12:00:00 AM - First Black legal protest in America pressed by

First Black legal protest in America pressed by eleven Blacks who petitioned for freedom in New Netherlands (New York). Council of New Netherlands freed the eleven petitioners because they had "served the Company seventeen or eighteen years" and had been "long since promised their freedom on the same footing as other free people in New Netherlands."
Learn More »

2/1/1644 12:00:00 AM - First Black Petition

First black legal protest in America pressed by eleven blacks who petitioned for freedom in New Netherlands (New York). Council of New Netherlands freed the eleven petitioners because they had "served the Company seventeen or eighteen years" and had been "long since promised their freedom on the same footing as other free people in New Netherlands."
Learn More »

3/4/1869 12:00:00 AM - Forty-second Congress convened

Forty-second Congress convened (1871-73) with five Black congressmen: Joseph H. Rainey, Robert Carlos Delarge and Robert Brown Elliott,South Carolina; Benjamin S. Turner, Alabama; Josiah T. Walls, Florida. Walls was elected in an at-large election and was the first Black congressman to represent an entire state.
Learn More »

2/15/1968 12:00:00 AM - Henry Lewis

On this day Henry Lewis becomes the first African American to lead a symphony orchestra in the United States.
Learn More »

6/18/1968 12:00:00 AM - Housing discrimination banned

Supreme Court banned racial discrimination in sale and rental of housing.
Learn More »

4/11/1990 12:00:00 AM - Idahao Recognizes MLK Holiday

Idaho became the 47th state to recognize Jan. 15 as Martin Luther King, Jr. Day and as a national holiday.
Learn More »

4/4/1968 12:00:00 AM - Independence Day

Independence Day in the Republic of Senegal.
Learn More »

3/4/0001 12:00:00 AM - Independence Day, Senegal

Independence Day - Republic of Senegal.
Learn More »

3/28/1968 12:00:00 AM - Interruption of Protest March

Race riot in Memphis, Tenn. interrupted protest march led by Martin Luther King Jr. in support of striking sanitation workers. National Guard called up.
Learn More »

4/18/1955 12:00:00 AM - James B. Parsons

James B. Parsons named chief judge of the Federal District Court in Chicago and became the first Black to hold that position.
Learn More »

3/19/1975 12:00:00 AM - James B. Parsons

James B. Parsons becomes the first African American chief judge of a federal court, the U.S. District Court of Chicago. In 1961, Parsons became the first African American district court judge
Learn More »

6/30/1926 12:00:00 AM - James Weldon Johnson was honored by NAACP

James Weldon Johnson was honored for his careers as an executive of the NAACP, a member of the United States Consul, editor, and poet by the NAACP in New York City.
Learn More »

2/27/1869 12:00:00 AM - John W. Menard speaks in Congress

John W. Menard spoke in Congress in defense of his claim to a contested seat in Louisiana's Second Congressional District. Congress decided against both claimants. Congressman James A. Garfield of the examining committee said "it was too early to admit a Negro to the U.S. Congress." Menard was the first Black to make a speech in Congress.
Learn More »

2/6/1870 12:00:00 AM - Jonathan Jasper Wright

On this day, Jonathan Jasper Wright was elected to the South Carolina Supreme Court.
Learn More »

2/1/1870 12:00:00 AM - Jonathan Jasper Wright

Jonathan Jasper Wright is elected to the South Carolina Supreme Court. He is the first African American to hold a major judicial position.
Learn More »

6/3/1919 12:00:00 AM - Liberty Life Insurance Company (Chicago)

Liberty Life Insurance Company (Chicago), the first old-line legal reserve company organized by Blacks in the North, incorporated. U.S. Supreme Court (Irene Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia) banned segregation in interstate bus travel.
Learn More »

6/29/1868 12:00:00 AM - Louisiana legislature met in New Orleans

Louisiana legislature met in New Orleans. The temporary chairman of the house was a Black representative, R.H. Isabelle. Oscar J. Dunn presided over the senate. Seven of the thirty-six senators were Black. Thirty-five of the 101 representatives were Black.
Learn More »

4/9/1939 12:00:00 AM - Marian Anderson performs for 65,000 on the steps

Marian Anderson performs for 65,000 on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial after she is refused admission to the Daughters of the American Revolution's Constitutional Hall
Learn More »

5/6/1812 12:00:00 AM - Marin R

Marin R. Delany, pioneer Black nationalist, born free in Charles Town, Virginia.
Learn More »

3/20/1852 12:00:00 AM - Martin R. Delany

Martin R. Delany published The Condition, Elevation, Emigration and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States, it was the first major statement of the Black nationalist position. Delany said, "The claims of no people, according to established policy and usage, are respected by any nation, until they are presented in a national capacity." He added: "We are a nation within a nation; as the Poles in Russia, the Hungarians in Austria, the Welsh, Irish, and Scotch in the British dominions."
Learn More »

6/19/1971 12:00:00 AM - Mayor declared a state of emergency in Ga.

Mayor declared a state of emergency in Columbus, Ga., racial disturbance.
Learn More »

6/4/1946 12:00:00 AM - Mississippi Valley State University

Mississippi Valley State University is founded in Itta Bena, Miss.
Learn More »

6/28/1970 12:00:00 AM - Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali, (born Cassius Clay) stands before the Supreme Court regarding his refusal of induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War(Clay v- United States). He is asked "How can you be a pacifist opposed to the idea of war?" One of Ali's responses goes as follows, "I am not going ten thousand miles from here to help murder and kill and burn poor people simply to help continue the domination of white slave masters over the darker people."
Learn More »

6/20/1967 12:00:00 AM - Muhammad Ali convicted in Houston, Texas, federal

Muhammad Ali convicted in Houston, Texas, in federal courts for violating Selective Service Act by refusing induction into the armed services. He was fined $10,000 and sentenced to five years in prison. Ali, an opponent of the Vietnam War, had refused to report for service on grounds that he was a Muslim minister.
Learn More »

3/15/1933 12:00:00 AM - NAACP began a coordinated attack on segregation

NAACP began a coordinated attack on segregation and discrimination, filing a suit against the University of North Carolina on behalf of Thomas Hocutt. Case was lost on a technicality after the president of a Black college refused to certify the records of the plaintiff.
Learn More »

2/12/1909 12:00:00 AM - NAACP founded

Founded in 1909 in New York City by a group of black and white citizens committed to social justice, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation's largest and strongest civil rights organization. The NAACP's principal objective is to ensure the political, educational, social and economic equality of minority group citizens of United States and eliminate race prejudice. The NAACP seeks remove all barriers of racial discrimination through democratic processes. This mission is accomplished by seeking the enactment and enforcement of federal, state and local laws securing civil rights, and by informing the public of the adverse effects of racial discrimination. From school desegregation, fair housing, employment and voter registration, to health and equal economic opportunity, the NAACP, working successfully with allies of all races, plays a significant role in establishing legal precedents in order to improve the quality of life of America's downtrodden. For more than ninety one years, the NAACP has been built on the individual and collective courage of thousands of people. People of all races, nationalities and religious denominations, who were united on one premise --that all men and women are created equal. Although, one could write great prose about the triumphs of the NAACP, there is nothing more powerful than the facts of how the existence of the oldest civil rights organization has changed the face of history for this country. And despite threats of violence, and official government policies that were racist the NAACP continued and will continue to persevere
Learn More »

2/4/1971 12:00:00 AM - National Guard mobilized to quell rioting in

National Guard mobilized to quell rioting in Wilmington, North Carolina. Two persons killed. Until the 9th.
Learn More »

2/18/0001 12:00:00 AM - National Independence Day in Gambia

National Independence Day in Gambia
Learn More »

4/16/1868 12:00:00 AM - New Constitution Banned Segregation

Louisiana voters approved new constitution and elected state officers, including the first Black lieutenant governor, Oscar J. Dunn, and the first Black state treasurer, Antoine Dubuclet. Article Thirteen of the new constitution banned segregation in public accommodation: "All the persons shall enjoy equal rights and privileges upon any conveyances of a public character; and all places of business, or of public resort, or for which a license is required by either State, Parish or municipal authority, shall be deemed places of a public character and shall be opened to the accommodation and patronage of all persons, without distinction or discrimination on account of race or color."
Learn More »

2/15/1804 12:00:00 AM - New Jersey begins to abolish slavery

The New Jersey Legislature approved a law calling for "gradual" emancipation of African Americans. In so doing, New Jersey became the last Northern state to outlaw slavery.
Learn More »

3/31/1930 12:00:00 AM - Nomination of Judge John J. Parker

President Hoover nominated Judge John J. Parker of North Carolina for a seat on the U.S. Supreme Court. The NAACP launched a national campaign against the appointment. Parker was not confirmed by the Senate.
Learn More »

2/17/1902 12:00:00 AM - Opera singer Marian Anderson born

Opera singer Marian Anderson was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Anderson was entered in the New York Philharmonic Competition at age 17 by her music teacher, and placed first over 299 other singers. Awarded a Rosenwald Fellowship in 1930, Anderson went to Europe for a year of study. She returned briefly to the United States but went back to Europe in 1933 to debut in Berlin and again, in 1935, in Austria. In 1933, Anderson performed 142 concerts in Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Finland. On Easter Sunday in 1939, Anderson performed an open air recital at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. The performance was scheduled for the concert hall controlled by the Daughters of the American Revolution but was cancelled when the DAR refeused to allow Anderson to sing there. In 1955, Anderson signed with New York's Metropolitan Opera Company.
Learn More »

2/11/1898 12:00:00 AM - Owen L. W. Smith - minister to Liberia

Owen L. W. Smith of North Carolina, AME Zion minister and educator, named minister to Liberia.
Learn More »

4/10/1968 12:00:00 AM - Passing of Civil Rights Bill

U.S. Congress pass Civil Rights Bill banning racial discrimination in sale or rental of approximately 80 per cent of the nation's housing.
Learn More »

4/29/1968 12:00:00 AM - Poor People's Campaign

Poor People's Campaign began with Ralph Abernathy, SCLC president, leading delegation of leaders representing poor whites, Blacks, Indians, and Spanish Americans to Capitol Hill for conferences with cabinet members and congressional leaders.
Learn More »

6/11/1967 12:00:00 AM - Race riot in Florida

Race riot, Tampa, Florida. National Guard mobilized.
Learn More »

2/26/1946 12:00:00 AM - Race riot, Columbia, Tennessee

Race riot, Columbia, Tennessee. Two killed and ten wounded.
Learn More »

4/29/1981 12:00:00 AM - Racially Motivated Slayings

Buffalo, N.Y., grand jury indicted Pvt. Joseph G. Christopher of the U.S. Army on murder charges stemming from the racially motivated slayings of three Blacks in September, 1980.
Learn More »

12/7/1942 12:00:00 AM - Reginald F. Lewis

Lewis was born on this day in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpe & Lewis, the first Black law firm on Wall Street. In 1989 he became president and CEO of TLC Beatrice International Holding Inc. With TLC's leverage acquisition of Beatrice International Food Company, Lewis became the head of the largest Black-owned business in the United States. TLC Beatrice had revenues of $1.54 billion in 1992.
Learn More »

2/3/0001 12:00:00 AM - Reginald F. Lewis

Lewis was born on this day in Baltimore, Maryland. He received his law degree from Harvard Law School in 1968. He was a partner in Murphy, Thorpes& Lewis, the first black law firm on Wall Street. In 1989 he became president and CEO of TLC Beatrice International food Company, Lewis became the head of the largest black-owned business in the United States. TLC Beatrice had revenues of $1.54 billion in 1992
Learn More »

2/8/1985 12:00:00 AM - Reporter at Large

Brenda Renee Pearson an official court reporter for the House of Representatives was the first black female to record the State of the Union message delivered by the president in the House chambers.
Learn More »

3/15/1980 12:00:00 AM - Scores injured in Klan-related incidents

Scores injured in Klan-related incidents in Georgia, Tennessee, California, Indiana and North Carolina, in March and April.
Learn More »

5/2/2002 12:00:00 AM - Slavery Purchased America's Freedom

Slavery Purchased America's Freedom: While the white Americans profit from slave trade, they actually benefited from the slave system to fund the war against England. As one historian put it, Americans actually purchased their freedom with products grown by slaves and then traded to the French during the War of Independence. Before the war, agricultural products such as rice, indigo, and tobacco all produced by enslaved Africans were America's most valuable exports. Without the slave trade and slavery, America would never have been able to generate the wealth to gain its freedom from England, at least in the 1700s. As a member of the British Parliament acknowledged after the war. I know not why we should blush to confess slavery was an essential ingredient of American Independence.
Learn More »

6/25/1773 12:00:00 AM - Slaves Petition for Freedom

Massachusetts slaves petitioned the state legislature for freedom. A bill was drawn and passed by the Mass. legislature. But the governor witheld approval and the measure never became law.
Learn More »

4/8/1980 12:00:00 AM - State Troopers Called in to Stop Racial Incidents

State troopers mobilized to stop disturbances in Wrightsville, Georgia. Racial incidents were also reported in 1980 in Chattanooga, Tenn., Oceanside, Calif., Kokomo, Ind., Wichita, Kans., and Johnston County, North Carolina.
Learn More »

6/19/1969 12:00:00 AM - State troopers ordered to Cairo, Ill.

State troopers ordered to Cairo, Ill., to quell racial disturbances.
Learn More »

2/20/1968 12:00:00 AM - State troopers used tear gas to stop demonstrations

State troopers used tear gas to stop demonstrations at Alcorn A&M College.
Learn More »

2/5/1962 12:00:00 AM - Suit seeking to bar Englewood, N.J., from

Suit seeking to bar Englewood, N.J., from maintaining "racial segregated" elementary schools filed in U.S. District Court.
Learn More »

3/7/1927 12:00:00 AM - Supreme Court decision

Supreme Court decision (Nixon v. Herndon) struck down Texas law which barred Blacks from voting in "white primary."
Learn More »

5/3/1948 12:00:00 AM - Supreme Court ruled in Shelley v

Supreme Court ruled in Shelley v. Kraemer that federal and state courts could not enforce restrictive convenants which barred persons from owning or occupying property because of their race.
Learn More »

4/20/1971 12:00:00 AM - Supreme Court Rules on Busing

U.S. Supreme Court ruled unanimously that busing was a constitutionally acceptable method of integrating public schools.
Learn More »

4/28/1941 12:00:00 AM - Supreme Court Ruling for Separate and Equal

Supreme Court ruled in railroad Jim Crow case brought by Congressman Arthur Mitchell that separate facilities must be substantially equal.
Learn More »

6/28/1971 12:00:00 AM - The overturned draft evasion conviction

U.S. Supreme Court unanimously overturned the draft evasion conviction of Muhammad Ali.
Learn More »

3/19/1883 12:00:00 AM - The shoe-lasting machine invented by Jan Matzeliger not only revolutionized the

The shoe-lasting machine invented by Jan Matzeliger not only revolutionized the shoe industry but also made Lynn, Massachusetts, the "shoe capital of the world." Born in Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana, Matzeliger found employment in the government machine works at the age of 10. Eight years later he immigrated to the United States, settling in Philadelphia, where he worked in s shoe factory. He later moved to New England, settling permanently in Lynn. The Industrial Revolution had by this time resulted in the invention of machines to cut, sew, and tack shoes, but none had been perfected to last a shoe. Seeing this, Matzeliger lost little time in designing and patenting just such a device, one which he refined over the years to a point where it could adjust a shoe, arrange the leather over the sole, drive in the nails, and deliver the finished product- all in one minute's time. Matzeliger's patent was subsequently bought by Sydney W. Winslow, who established the United Shoe Machine Company. The continued success of this business brought about a 50% reduction in the price of shoes across the nation, doubled wages, and improved working conditions for millions of people dependent on the shoe industry for their livelihood. Matzeliger died when only 37, long before he had the chance to realize a share of the enormous profit derived from his invention.
Learn More »

6/5/1950 12:00:00 AM - The Supreme Court weakened the foundations

U.S. Supreme Court undermined the legal foundations of segregation in three landmark cases, Sweatt v. Painter, McLaurin v. Oklahoma State Regents and Henderson v. United States.
Learn More »

5/1/1866 12:00:00 AM - Through the 3 White Democrats and police attacked

Through the 3 White Democrats and police attacked freedmen and their white allies in Memphis, Tennessee. Forty-six Blacks and two white liberals were killed. More than seventy were wounded. Ninety homes, twelve schools and four churches were burned.
Learn More »

3/1/1967 12:00:00 AM - U.S. House of Representatives expels Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

U.S. House of Representatives expelled Rep. Adam Clayton Powell Jr. by a vote of 307 to 116. Civil rights leaders said Powell was ousted because of his race.
Learn More »

3/8/1876 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Refuses to Seat P.B.S. Pinchback

U.S. Senate refuses to seat P.B.S. Pinchback, elected Senator from Louisiana in 1873, after three years of controversy.
Learn More »

2/5/1900 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Rep. Jefferson Long dies

U.S. Rep. Jefferson Long, elected from the state of Georgia, died in Washington D.C. Long was the only candidate interested in running for the 60-day term and he was duly elected.
Learn More »

6/10/1964 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Senate imposed cloture for first time

U.S. Senate imposed cloture for first time on a civil rights measure, ending Southern Filibuster by a vote of 71-29. Civil rights bill, with public accommodation and fair employment sections, was signed by President Johnson on July 2.
Learn More »

6/21/1915 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Supreme Court (Guinn v United States) said

U.S. Supreme Court (Guinn v United States) said "grandfather clauses" in the Oklahoma and Maryland constitutions violated the Fifteenth Amendment.
Learn More »

6/27/1979 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Weber v. Kaiser

U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Weber v. Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation that employers and unions can establish voluntary programs, including the use of quotas, to aid minorities in employment.
Learn More »

6/29/1972 12:00:00 AM - U.S. Supreme Court ruled the five-four decision

U.S. Supreme Court ruled the five-four decision that the death penalty was cruel and unusual punishment which violated the Eighth Amendment. At the time of the ruling, Blacks and members of other minority groups constituted 483 of the 60 persons awaiting execution.
Learn More »

3/31/1850 12:00:00 AM - United States Population: 23,191,876

United States Population: 23,191,876. Black population: 3,638,808 (15.7 per cent).
Learn More »

2/6/1820 12:00:00 AM - United States population: 9,638,453

United States population: 9,638,453. Black population: 1,771,656 (18.4 per cent). "Mayflower of Liberia" sailed from New York City with eighty-six Blacks. Ship arrived in Sierra Leone, March 9.
Learn More »

Buy BlackFacts T-Shirts
© 2016 BlackFacts.com